An Overview:

Sevensi Text

Last month I published a blogpost describing a number of phonological and orthographic changes to Modern Sevensi, a fictional language under provenance of the LANGDEV Project and the KIBI Jexr. In the time since, I have further refined the orthographic representation of Sevensi words, resulting in a writing system which is quite distinct from what is described there. This blogpost outlines the new Sevensi orthography, and a number of other Sevensi‐text–related topics.

The Sevensi Alphabet

The Sevensi alphabet is divided roughly into four sections:

Each Sevensi syllable consists of one consonant, followed by any number of consonant modifiers, followed by one vowel, followed by any number of vowel modifiers. ꞏ is typically omitted, except when combined with ˜, as ꞏ̃—it is the default vowel for a syllable, making the Latin orthography share some similarities with an abugida.

Survey of the Alphabet

(lowercase: ) is the first consonant in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is heng, and its Sevensi name is ꜧɛŋ (Anglicized: ʼengh). It represents the glottal stop, /ʔ/. In Modern Sevensi, the voiced and devoiced forms of Ꜧ are pronounced identically, but in Classical Sevensi the devoiced form was instead pronounced /h/.

In the past, I have considered a number of options for this letter, including the glottal stop letter itself (Ɂ). I opted for Ꜧ instead, which has been used for a variety of back‐of‐the‐throat sounds in various languages, both because it is a named, non‐IPA letter, and because it resembles H, the English equivalent for the Classical devoiced form.

Ɣ

Ɣ (lowercase: ɣ) is the second consonant in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is gamma, and its Sevensi name is ɣȝɛ (Anglicized: gye). It represents the velar stop, /g/ (voiced) or /k/ (devoiced).

Traditionally, the letter Ɣ is used to represent the velar fricative, not stop. In Sevensi, this sound is instead represented by Ƣ. Ɣ paralells Ꞵ as a Romanized Greek letter used to represent the voiced and devoiced forms of its Latin equivalent.

Sevensi uses a nontraditional shape for this character, with a straight right edge that parallels Ƣ. See the design notes further on in this document for more information.

Ƣ

Ƣ (lowercase: ƣ) is the third consonant in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is gha, and its Sevensi name is ƣɑ (Anglicized: xra). It represents the velar fricative, /ɣ/ (voiced) or /x/ (devoiced).

The letter Ƣ derives from the Latin letter Q, and was used to represent the same sound in a variety of Turkic languages.

(lowercase: ) is the fourth consonant in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is zet, and its Sevensi name is ꝣɩ (Anglicized: zhi). It represents the alveolo‐palatal sibilant fricative, /ʑ/ (voiced) or /ɕ/ (devoiced).

In the past I have used Ʒ to represent this letter, but this is too easily confusable with Ȝ. Ꝣ is a more visually‐distinct letter with a similar shape and purpose.

(lowercase: ) is the fifth consonant in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is beta, and its Sevensi name is ꞵȝɛ (Anglicized: bye). It represents the bilabial stop, /b/ (voiced) or /p/ (devoiced).

Traditionally, the letter Ꞵ is used to represent the bilabial fricative, not stop. This sound is not present in Sevensi. Ꞵ paralells Ɣ as a Romanized Greek letter used to represent the voiced and devoiced forms of its Latin equivalent. Its left‐hand descender and overall shape also parallels Ƿ.

Ƿ

Ƿ (lowercase: ƿ) is the sixth consonant in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is wynn, and its Sevensi name is ƿɑ (Anglicized: va). It represents the labiodental fricative, /v/ (voiced) or /f/ (devoiced).

Ƿ is an Old English letter which represented /w/. It is used here by allusion with the related Old Norse letter, Ꝩ, which also was used to represent /u/, and /v/. It bears no relation to P.

Ŋ

Ŋ (lowercase: ŋ) is the seventh consonant in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is eng, and its Sevensi name is ŋɛ̃ (Anglicized: nghen). It represents the velar nasal, /ŋ/.

Ŋ is a widespread and common character for representing this sound.

(lowercase: ) is the eighth consonant in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is cuatrillo, and its Sevensi name is ꜭȝɛ (Anglicized: jye). It represents the alveolo‐palatal sibilant affricate, /ʥ/ (voiced) or /ʨ/ (devoiced).

Ꜭ is a letter invented by a Franciscan friar, Alonso de la Parra, for representing the velar ejective /kʼ/ in Mayan. A variant with a comma (Ꜯ) was used to represent the alveolar ejective affricate /tsʼ/. The Sevensi usage of this letter draws mostly from the meaning of this variant Ꜯ form.

The choice of Ꜭ also benefits from its similarity in appearance to J, the closest English approximation for its voiced form; the Unicode proposal for the letter describes its design as follows: Take capital J and small j and attach the flag of a 4 to it.

◌̊

◌̊ is the first consonant modifier in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is ring above, and its Sevensi name is ꜧ̊ẽ (Anglicized: ʼwen). It represents the labiovelar approximant, /w/ (voiced) or /ʍ/ (devoiced). In the context of Sevensi, it may be called the labialization mark.

This character derives from the shape of the Latin letter O, which has long been used to represent rounding in Sevensi.

◌̕

◌̕ is the second consonant modifier in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is comma above right, and its Sevensi name is ꜭ̕ɛ (Anglicized: che). It indicates that the syllable is devoiced. In the context of Sevensi, it may be called the devoicing mark.

An apostrophe or comma above is a common symbol for indicating devoicing or aspiration. In Modern Sevensi, devoicing affects not only the base consonant of the syllable, but also (if present) its labialization.

(lowercase: ) is the third consonant modifier in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is R‐rotunda, and its Sevensi name is ꜧɩꜧꝛ (Anglicized: ʼiʼd). It represents the alveolar tap /ɾ/ or trill /r/ (these are not distinguished in Sevensi). In the context of Sevensi, it may be called the trill mark.

In traditional Latin typography, Ꝛ is a typographical variant of R after rounded letters. It was chosen to represent the trill mark in Sevensi because of the way it visually appears to connect with the preceding character, bridging the gap between a diacritic and a distinct letter.

Ȝ

Ȝ (lowercase: ȝ) is the fourth consonant modifier in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is yogh, and its Sevensi name is ꜧȝɛ (Anglicized: ʼye). It represents the palatal approximant, /j/. In the context of Sevensi, it may be called the palatalization mark.

Ȝ is an Old/Middle English letter which represented this sound.

Ɩ

Ɩ (lowercase: ɩ) is the first vowel in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is iota, and its Sevensi name is ꜧɩ (Anglicized: ʼi). It represents the Sevensi iota, /i/.

In Classical Sevensi, the iota was used to form diphthongs. By Modern Sevensi, this process developed into palatalization, but the iota persisted as an independent vowel.

Ɛ

Ɛ (lowercase: ɛ) is the second vowel in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is open‐E, and its Sevensi name is ꜧɛ (Anglicized: ʼe). It represents the Sevensi front unrounded vowel, /ɛ/.

This letter reflects the IPA letter for its sound.

(lowercase: ɑ) is the third vowel in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is alpha, and its Sevensi name is ꜧɑ (Anglicized: ʼa). It represents the Sevensi back unrounded vowel, /ɑ/.

This letter reflects the IPA letter for its sound.

Ʊ

Ʊ (lowercase: ʊ) is the fourth vowel in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is upsilon, and its Sevensi name is ꜧʊ (Anglicized: ʼu). It represents the Sevensi high rounded vowel, /u/.

Diphthongs with Ʊ are presumed to be the original forms of the Classical Sevensi rounded vowels. This letter‐shape was chosen as a compliment to Ɩ, which was also used to form diphthongs.

Ɔ

Ɔ (lowercase: ɔ) is the fifth vowel in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is open‐O, and its Sevensi name is ꜧɔ (Anglicized: ʼo). It represents the Sevensi low rounded vowel, /ɔ/.

This letter reflects the IPA letter for its sound. It is the result of a merger between two Classical Sevensi rounded vowels, Ꞷ and Ɵ.

𐒳

𐒳 (lowercase: 𐓛) is the sixth vowel in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is lambda, and its Sevensi name is ꜧ𐓛 (Anglicized: ʼl). It represents the Sevensi syllabic L, /l/ (regular), /ɫ/ (labialized), or /n/ (nasal).

In a previous Classical Sevensi orthography, a lambda with stroke (ƛ) was used to represent the syllabic sequence đ̕𐓛, from which this letter developed. This, in turn, was inspired by American Phoneticist usage.

Latin lambda does not exist in Unicode, so the visually‐similar Osage letter is used instead. Note that the capital form resembles a turned Y and not a Greek Λ.

is the seventh vowel in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is middle dot, and its Sevensi name is ꜧȝꞏ̃ (Anglicized: ʼyn). It represents the Sevensi neutral vowel, /ʌ/.

Note that the Unicode encoding for this character is U+A78F ꞏ LATIN LETTER SINOLOGICAL DOT and not U+00B7 · MIDDLE DOT (which is a symbol, not a letter). U+02D1 ˑ MODIFIER LETTER HALF TRIANGULAR COLON was considered, but rejected on account of the fact that it is generally the wrong shape and as a vowel, this is not a modifier letter.

◌̃

◌̃ is the first vowel modifier in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is tilde, and its Sevensi name is ꜧ𐓛̃ꜧ (Anglicized: ʼlnʼ). It indicates that the syllable is nasalized. In the context of Sevensi, it may be called the nasalization mark.

◌̃ is a common and widely‐used mark for indicating nasalization. It resembles a small N.

Ʀ

Ʀ (lowercase: ʀ) is the second vowel modifier in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is Yr, and its Sevensi name is ꜧɑʀꜧɔ (Anglicized: ʼarʼo). It represents the alveolar approximant, /ɹ/. In the context of Sevensi, it may be called the rhotic mark.

Ʀ is the Latin transcription for an Old Norse letter which signified a rhotic consonant at the end of words. It holds a similar significance in Sevensi.

Archaïc Letters

Classical and Middle Sevensi had a somewhat different set of available sounds. The additional 4 letters ÞƟꞶ can be used to express these as follows:

Þ

Þ (lowercase: þ) is the ninth consonant in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is thorn, and its Sevensi name is þɔ (Anglicized: dho). It represents the alveolar stop, /d/ (voiced) or /t/ (devoiced).

Þ is an Old and Middle English letter which represented /θ/ and /ð/. As with Ɣ and Ꞵ, it is a letter which traditionally represents a fricative but which is used in Sevensi to represent a voiced/devoiced pair of stops.

In Classical Sevensi texts, Þ is typically collated after Ƣ (before Ꝣ).

(lowercase: ɱ) is the tenth consonant in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is meng, and its Sevensi name is ɱɑ̃ (Anglicized: man). It represents the bilabial nasal, /m/.

Ɱ is simply a modified version of the traditional Latin letter for this sound, M, to better match the shape and appearance of the other consonants.

In Classical Sevensi texts, Ɱ is typically collated after Ŋ (before Ꜭ).

Ɵ

Ɵ (lowercase: ɵ) is the eighth vowel in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is barred‐O, and its Sevensi name is ꜧɵ (Anglicized: ʼø). It represents the Sevensi front rounded vowel, /o/.

In Classical Sevensi, Ɵ was the rounded pair for the unrounded Ɛ. It's letter shape is a fully closed E, in contrast to the open Ɛ.

In Classical Sevensi texts, Ɵ is typically collated after Ɛ (before Ɑ).

(lowercase: ) is the ninth vowel in the Sevensi alphabet. Its English name is omega, and its Sevensi name is ꜧꞷ (Anglicized: ʼå). It represents the Sevensi back rounded vowel, /ɒ/.

In Classical Sevensi, Ꞷ was the rounded pair for the unrounded Ɑ. It was deemed suitable that omega be the Latin letter for the rounded pairing of alpha.

In Classical Sevensi texts, Ꞷ is typically collated after Ɑ (before Ʊ).

Letter and Script Design

Broad design goals.

Sevensi phonology can differ quite dramatically from that of English or other Latin‐script languages. Consequently, one of the primary goals for the Sevensi script was visual distinctiveness; none of the letters are a part of the Basic Latin set. The Sevensi script brings a number of old, largely‐unused Latin characters back into the scenery; nevertheless, it remains a Latin script, and is designed for use with Latin typographic traditions like capitalization and italics.

In previous Sevensi scripts, voiced and devoiced sounds were given separate letters, as is typical for Latin scripts. However, this approach was not a good match for Sevensi phonology, which approaches voicing on the level of the syllable, not letter. Furthermore, supporting devoiced letters would require increasing the character count to (at minimum) 25, making the task of creäting ASCII equivalents for each letter more difficult. There is not, for example, a straightforward answer as to what the devoiced pairing for H or X should be.

The Sevensi Latin script has been designed such that each consonant has a descender. In contrast, modifiers and vowels should not descend below the baseline. This visually aids in splitting up Sevensi words into their syllable components.

The consonant modifiers ◌̊◌̕ꝚȜ bear a visual similarity to the numerals 0123; this is a coïncidence, but may be useful in remembering their order.

Script status and Unicode.

The script outlined above is described as Romanized and Latin to distinguish it from the syllabic alphabetical Sevensi script currently in development. Most of its characters can be clearly unified with existing Latin characters already encoded into Unicode. There are two exceptions:

  • The character 𐒳, whose shape is correct but is not presently encoded as Latin; the codepoints used in this document are U+104B3 𐒳 OSAGE CAPITAL LETTER AH and U+104DB 𐓛 OSAGE SMALL LETTER AH. True Latin lambdas, with the same shape as the Osage characters, would be preferred, as the Osage letter represents an entirely different sound. The private‐use characters U+101061 and U+101062 are recommended for the capital and small forms of these characters in situations where the Osage characters prove undesirable.

  • The character Ɣ, which is a Latin character, but has the incorrect shape: In Sevensi typography, this character should appear as a reversed Ꝩ, with a straight (not looped) descender on the right‐hand side. This, too, should probably have a separate encoding, the unification with Ɣ beïng a technical stopgap measure. (In particular, the Sevensi Ɣ should not be used for phonetic transcription, where it might be confused with Y.) The private‐use characters U+101063 and U+101064 are recommended for the capital and small forms of these characters in situations where unification proves undesirable.

Of course, given the fact that the Romanized Sevensi script includes no characters from Basic Latin, and that the extended Latin characters it does use often take on a subtly different meaning, it is an open question as to whether it is a true Latin script at all, and not merely Latin‐derived. This is a question for the Unicode Consortium and other classifiers of scripts, and should take into account both the traditions of Latin typesetting as well as the principles of Sevensi character design which are outlined here, and which will doubtlessly continue to evolve over the language's lifetime.

Casing.

Only the consonants can appear at the beginning of words; consequently, a minimal font need only support capital forms for the consonants. However, the other letters may appear in capitalized or small‐capital form in titles or other specialized applications.

Combining characters are, as is typical for Latin scripts, not cased, and neither is ꞏ (which is largely just a placeholder character for use with ◌̃). All other characters have capital and small forms.

By convention, Sevensi capitalizes the first letter of each sentence and of nouns which utilize the proper article ꜭ̕.

The consonants.

The Sevensi consonants can roughly be categorized into two categories: consonants with hooks (Ꜧ, Ꝣ, Ŋ, Ꜭ, Ɱ) and consonants with straight descenders (Ɣ, Ƣ, Ꞵ, Ƿ, Þ).

The right‐hand components of Ꜧ, Ŋ, Ꜭ, and Ɱ should all be indentical, and match that of the Basic Latin J; the capital of Ŋ should resemble N and not its lowercase form. The hooks of all of these characters should drop below, and not rest upon, the baseline, even in their capital forms.

The hook of Ꝣ should match those on the other hooked characters; this is somewhat smaller and more subtle than is typical for the character. Indeed, Ꝣ might be described as a C, Z, and J stacked on top of one another. The height of capital Ꝣ should not exceed that of the other letters; the height of small Ꝣ should match that of small Ꞵ. Small Ꝣ may be given a less pronounced upper curl to distinguish it from its capital form.

The decenders of Ɣ, Ƣ, Ꞵ, Ƿ, and Þ should all drop below the baseline an equal amount and have an identical appearance, in both the capital and small forms; Ƣ, Ƿ, and Þ in particular should always be written with their vertical strokes dropping below the baseline.

Ɣ should be rendered with a straight right edge and no loop, resembling a reversed Ꝩ, with the vertex on the baseline. Compare the the lowercase Greek letter, which approximates this shape at a slant, especially in mathematical usage and italic fonts. The left‐hand branch may be either straight or curl downward.

The capital Ꞵ should resemble B with a left‐hand descender; the lowercase form may be open at the bottom or closed, and should have a rounded top. The height of small Ꞵ should match Ꝣ, both of which may be taller than other lowercase letters.

Care should be taken to distinguish Ƿ and Þ; the latter should have an ascender in its small form and its bowl should not exceed one X‐height regardless of case. Captial Þ should resemble capital Ꞵ minus its upper bowl. Þ may be open at the top (with a more Y‐like appearance) or closed; Ƿ, on the other hand, must always be closed.

The straight middle‐crossbars of capital Ꜧ, Ꝣ, Ꞵ, and Ꜭ should all have the same height; notably, the flag of capital Ꜭ should not rest on the baseline (unlike with its small form).

The consonant modifiers.

◌̊ should be placed above the hump of small Ꜧ, not above the entire character, reflecting its position for Ŋ.

◌̕ should always be written next to (and not above or below) ◌̊. The former may influence the position of the latter (by shifting it to the left). For characters lacking ◌̊, ◌̕ may instead take the shape of ◌̓, beïng centred on its base character rather than aligned with the right edge—this is a font‐level decision.

The capital Ꝛ should follow the shape of a capital R, minus its left downward stroke; small Ꝛ should resemble a small numeral 2 moreso than its capital form. Its shape should not copy small Ʀ.

The hook of Ȝ should match the hooks of the consonant letters (dropping below the baseline even in the capital form); the upper half of the character should match Ꝛ in both captial and small forms. Visually, Ȝ should take the appearance of Ꝛ‐with‐hook.

The vowels.

Unlike the consonants, vowels do not have descenders. With the exception of 𐒳, the uppercase and lowercase forms have the same shape. This contrasts with the Greek versions of these characters, where the capital form can differ starkly from the small one.

𐒳 is a Latin lambda, although its shape more closely resembles a reversed, turned Y than the Greek letter. The small form should be drawn with straight lines, and the ascender should not terminate in a hook.

ꞏ should be drawn somewhat larger than the dots in the period (.), colon (:), or interpunct (·), and the top of the dot should align with the X‐height of the font.

The vowel modifiers.

◌̃ should be written at the same height for all vowels of the same case; in the case of small (but not capital) 𐒳, it will cross the ascender.

When it is combined with ꞏ, ◌̃ may increase the overal width of the character; ꞏ̃ should have the same width as the small tilde on its own (˜).

Capital Ʀ should be rendered as Þ with a tail; this tail may (but need not) cross the baseline so long as it does not have the same shape as either of the consonant descenders (instead extending out at a diagonal and/or curling upward). Small Ʀ should be rendered as a small capital R (with no descender).

Punctuation.

Sevensi utilizes standard Latin spacing and punctuation, leaning closer to the English tradition than French. Single curly quotes (‘’) are preferred at the top level for dialogue; double angle quotes («») may be used when directly quoting from a known (usually, printed) source. Parentheses (()) and brackets ([]) have their usual meanings; curly braces ({}) may be used to contain a list of items, separated by commas. Bangs (!) and queries (?) are generally superfluous and need not be employed. The pipe (|) may be used as a reverse‐colon.

Other Alphabets

The ASCII Alphabet.

There are ASCII equivalents for all of the Sevensi letters and modifier marks. The ASCII alphabet, in the same order as the above, is: HGXZBVNJ // W'DY // IEAUOL- // ~R. Because the meaning of each Sevensi letter can be quite different from the traditional interpretation of its ASCII form, using the native (non–Basic Latin) representation is preferred wherever possible.

The ASCII representations of the archaïc characters are TM // %@.

The Anglicized Alphabet.

In order to make Sevensi words easier to parse for non‐native speakers, it is suggested that specialized alphabets be used when incorporating Sevensi words into other languages. The Anglicized Alphabet is more suitable than the ASCII representation for writing Sevensi words in English.

Consonants (with the exception of Ŋ, which is always voiced in Sevensi) have separate voiced and devoiced equivalents. These are as follows:

Sevensi Voiced Devoiced
ʼʼh
Ɣ GK
Ƣ XrKh
ZhSh
BP
Ƿ VF
Ŋ Ngh
JCh

The remaining characters have straightforward equivalents:

Sevensi Anglicized
◌̊ W
D
Ȝ Y
Ɩ I
Ɛ E
A
Ʊ U
Ɔ O
𐒳 L
(Æ)
◌̃ N
Ʀ R

The letter ꞏ is usually not transcribed, but Æ is the accepted letter should the occasion arise.

There are also Anglicizations for the archaïc Sevensi consonants:

Sevensi Voiced Devoiced
Þ DhT
M

…And vowels (drawing from the Dano‐Norwegian alphabet):

Sevensi Anglicized
Ɵ Ø
Å
The Hex Alphabet.

Because Sevensi has a rigid syllable structure, the number of characters in the alphabet can be reduced by reüsing consonants as vowel modifiers and vowels as consonant modifiers. The minimum number of characters under such a system is 8 consonants + 7 vowels = 15. By adding a space character, we arrive at a lossless transformation of Sevensi words and phrases into just 16 ASCII characters, which can then be easily interpreted as hexidecimal digits by a computer program. As the maximal Sevensi syllable 8 characters long, this means that any Sevensi syllable can easily be interpreted as a 32-bit integer (padded with spaces) under this system.

The letters of the Hex alphabet, as they correspond to the native/ASCII ones, are: HGRZBVNJ // U'LI // IEAUOL' // NR. The sixteen letters, in order, are: <space>HGRZBVNJU'LIEAO. The duplicates are: R and N, which are consonants if they precede a vowel or consonant modifier, and vowel modifiers if they precede a potential consonant; and U, ', L, and I, which are consonant modifiers if they precede a potential vowel, and vowels otherwise.

Vocalic ' cannot be dropped in the Hex alphabet representation, and archaïc characters are not supported.

Summary.

The following table summarizes each Sevensi letter and its various representations:

Sevensi ASCII Anglicized Hex
H ʼʼh H
Ɣ G GK G
Ƣ X XrKh R
Z ZhSh Z
B BP B
Ƿ V VF V
Ŋ N Ngh N
J JCh J
◌̊ W W U
◌̕ ' '
D D L
Ȝ Y Y I
Ɩ I I I
Ɛ E E E
A A A
Ʊ U U U
Ɔ O O O
𐒳 L L L
- (Æ) '
◌̃ ~ N N
Ʀ R R R
Þ T DhT
M M
Ɵ C Ø
Q Å

Sevensi Keyboards

With the new Sevensi alphabet, naturally new Sevensi keyboards are required. These layouts are given below:

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ƒ +
ŋ ƣ ƿ ʀ ʊ ɔ 𐓛 = < > ±
ɣ ȝ ɩ ɛ ɑ ◌̊ ◌̕
[ ] , . ( ) ◌̃
! ? # % © ¥ $ @ Ƒ ÷ ×
Ŋ Ƣ Ƿ Ʀ Ʊ Ɔ 𐒳
Ɣ Ȝ | Ɩ Ɛ ◌̌ ʼ
{ } ; : `
/ ® þ ɱ ɵ θ ¬ &
n x j v d r u o l ^
h g z b y - i e a w '
* « » ~
_
§ \ 🄯 Þ Ɵ Θ
N X J V D R U O L
H G Z B Y I E A W "
_
Sevensi Roman keyboard layout
` 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 - =
q w e r t y u i o p [ ] \
a s d f g h j k l ; '
z x c v b n m , . /
~ ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) _ +
Q W E R T Y U I O P { } |
A S D F G H J K L : "
Z X C V B N M < > ?
` ¬ ɵ ˇ ¨ ´ ˜ ˚
« » ɛ ʀ þ ȝ ʊ ɩ ɔ θ
ɑ æ ƒ ɣ œ 𐓛 ʼ
ƣ ø ƿ ŋ ɱ
Ɵ ˇ ¨ ´ ˜ ˚ ±
Ɛ Ʀ Þ Ȝ Ʊ Ɩ Ɔ Θ
Æ Ƒ Ɣ Œ 𐒳 ʼ
Ƣ Ø Ƿ Ŋ
Bilingual Sevensi Roman keyboard layout

An Apple keyboard bundle (created with Ukelele) is available for users of macOS devices, which makes the above layouts available in System Preferences once unzipped and installed into ~/Library/Keyboard Layouts/. It may be used as a basis for similar input methods on other platforms.